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History

Neighborhood Fabric: Survivors

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Neighborhood Fabric: Survivors

As we enjoy the more than 1,000 historic buildings that make up Soulard, it is easy to forget about how many more houses there used to be, since lost. The 1800 block of South 7th Street is a good such illustration. In that block, only three of the houses that stood in 1875 still stand today.

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Soulard Market’s history predates Missouri statehood

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Soulard Market’s history predates Missouri statehood

Since 1779, 42 years before Missouri became a state, the Soulard Farmer’s Market has remained a cornerstone of the St. Louis community. The market- place is located in St. Louis’ historic Soulard district, which is named after Antoine Soulard, a surveyor who first developed the land after taking refuge from the French Revolution.

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New signage to accent Soulard’s history

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New signage to accent Soulard’s history

The Residential Promotion Committee of the Soulard Restoration Group is working to install a series of signs throughout Soulard on historically and/ or architecturally significant buildings. The goal is to recognize and celebrate the history of the neighborhood, the oldest surviving residential neighborhood in the City of St. Louis.

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Mardi Gras: A Frenchtown Legacy

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Mardi Gras: A Frenchtown Legacy

Although Soulard’s Mardi Gras has been celebrated but a few years, this festival has inherited a legacy of celebration and merrymaking in Frenchtown. Frenchtown was the longtime name of most of the area now generally known as the “near south side.” The present boundries of this former group of neighborhoods are more or less Busch Stadium to the north, the DeMenil mansion to the south, the Mississippi River to the east, and 14th Street to the west. Within these bounds lived the most wealthy set in early St. Louis, the handful of aristocratic French families whose lavish and frequent entertaining earned them the premiere place in St. Louis society. Today’s Mardi Gras stands as a legacy to those festive, carefree days of Frenchtown.

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